The Time Travellers Guide To Elizabethan England Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

The Time Traveler's Guide to Medieval England
Author: Ian Mortimer
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439112908
Pages: 352
Year: 2011-10-25
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The past is a foreign country: this is your guidebook. Take a step back into Ian Mortimer's guide and experience the middle ages like never before.
The Time Traveller's Guide to Elizabethan England
Author: Ian Mortimer
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1409029565
Pages: 432
Year: 2012-03-01
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The past is a foreign country - this is your guide, from the bestselling author of Time Traveller’s Guide to Medieval England We think of Queen Elizabeth I’s reign (1558-1603) as a golden age. But what was it actually like to live in Elizabethan England? If you could travel to the past and walk the streets of London in the 1590s, where would you stay? What would you eat? What would you wear? Would you really have a sense of it being a glorious age? And if so, how would that glory sit alongside the vagrants, diseases, violence, sexism and famine of the time? In this book Ian Mortimer reveals a country in which life expectancy is in the early thirties, people still starve to death and Catholics are persecuted for their faith. Yet it produces some of the finest writing in the English language, some of the most magnificent architecture, and sees Elizabeth's subjects settle in America and circumnavigate the globe. Welcome to a country that is, in all its contradictions, the very crucible of the modern world. ‘Vivid trip back to the 16th century...highly entertaining book’ Guardian
Terry Jones' Medieval Lives
Author: Alan Ereira, Terry Jones
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 140907045X
Pages: 224
Year: 2009-05-27
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Was medieval England full of knights on horseback rescuing fainting damsels in distress? Were the Middle Ages mired in superstition and ignorance? Why does nobody ever mention King Louis the First and Last? And, of course, those key questions: which monks were forbidden the delights of donning underpants... and did outlaws never wear trousers? Terry Jones and Alan Ereira are your guides to this most misrepresented and misunderstood period, and they point you to things that will surprise and provoke. Did you know, for example, that medieval people didn't think the world was flat? That was a total fabrication by an American journalist in the 19th century. Did you know that they didn't burn witches in the Middle Ages? That was a refinement of the so-called Renaissance. In fact, medieval kings weren't necessarily merciless tyrants, and peasants entertained at home using French pottery and fine wine. Terry Jones' Medieval Lives reveals Medieval Britain as you have never seen it before - a vibrant society teeming with individuality, intrigue and innovation.
Slavery by Another Name
Author: Douglas A. Blackmon
Publisher: Icon Books
ISBN: 1848314132
Pages: 496
Year: 2012-10-04
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A Pulitzer Prize-winning history of the mistreatment of black Americans. In this 'precise and eloquent work' - as described in its Pulitzer Prize citation - Douglas A. Blackmon brings to light one of the most shameful chapters in American history - an 'Age of Neoslavery' that thrived in the aftermath of the Civil War through the dawn of World War II. Using a vast record of original documents and personal narratives, Blackmon unearths the lost stories of slaves and their descendants who journeyed into freedom after the Emancipation Proclamation and then back into the shadow of involuntary servitude thereafter. By turns moving, sobering and shocking, this unprecedented account reveals these stories, the companies that profited the most from neoslavery, and the insidious legacy of racism that reverberates today.
How to be a Victorian
Author: Ruth Goodman
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0241958342
Pages: 480
Year: 2013-06-27
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How to be a Victorian - travel back in time with the BBC's Ruth Goodman Step into the skin of your ancestors . . . We know what life was like for Victoria and Albert. But what was it like for a commoner like you or me? How did it feel to cook with coal and wash with tea leaves? Drink beer for breakfast and clean your teeth with cuttlefish? Dress in whalebone and feed opium to the baby? Catch the omnibus to work and do the laundry in your corset? Surviving everyday life came down to the gritty details, the small necessities and tricks of living . . . How To Be A Victorian by Ruth Goodman is a radical new approach to history; a journey back in time more intimate, personal and physical than anything before. It is one told from the inside out - how our forebears interacted with the practicalities of their world - and it is a history of those things that make up the day-to-day reality of life, matters so small and seemingly mundane that people scarcely mention them in their diaries or letters. Moving through the rhythm of the day, from waking up to the sound of a knocker-upper man poking a stick at your window, to retiring for nocturnal activities, when the door finally closes on twenty four hours of life, this astonishing guide illuminates the overlapping worlds of health, sex, fashion, food, school, work and play. If you liked A Time Traveller's Guide to Medieval England or 1000 Years of Annoying the French, you will love this book. Ruth Goodman is an independent scholar and historian, specialising in social and domestic history. She works with a wide range of museums and other academic institutions exploring the past of ordinary people and their activities. She has presented a number of BBC 2 television series, including Victorian Farm, Edwardian Farm and Wartime Farm. In each of these programs, she spent a year recreating life from a different period. As well as her involvement with the Farm series, Ruth makes frequent appearances on The One Show and Coast.
The Time Traveller's Guide to Medieval England
Author: Ian Mortimer
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1448103789
Pages: 368
Year: 2012-02-29
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The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there... Imagine you could travel back to the fourteenth century. What would you see, and hear, and smell? Where would you stay? What are you going to eat? And how are you going to test to see if you are going down with the plague? In The Time Traveller's Guide Ian Mortimer's radical new approach turns our entire understanding of history upside down. History is not just something to be studied; it is also something to be lived, whether that's the life of a peasant or a lord. The result is perhaps the most astonishing history book you are ever likely to read; as revolutionary as it is informative, as entertaining as it is startling.
A History of Knowledge
Author: Charles Lincoln Van Doren
Publisher: Random House Digital, Inc.
ISBN: 0345373162
Pages: 422
Year: 1992
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Covers every aspect of knowledge--scientific, intellectual, and historical--from the beginning of the human experience into the twenty-first century and beyond
This Orient Isle
Author: Jerry Brotton
Publisher: Penguin Press
ISBN: 0141978678
Pages: 384
Year: 2017-03-02
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In 1570, after plots and assassination attempts against her, Elizabeth I was excommunicated by the Pope. It was the beginning of cultural, economic and political exchanges with the Islamic world of a depth not again experienced until the modern age. England signed treaties with the Ottoman Porte, received ambassadors from Morocco and shipped munitions to Marrakech in the hope of establishing an accord which would keep the common enemy of Catholic Spain at bay. This awareness of the Islamic world found its way into many of the great English cultural productions of the day - especially, of course, Shakespeare's Othello and The Merchant of Venice. This Orient Isle shows that England's relations with the Muslim world were far more extensive, and often more amicable, than we have ever appreciated, and that their influence was felt across the political, commercial and domestic landscape of Elizabethan England.
The Roots of Betrayal
Author: James Forrester
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 0755358600
Pages: 369
Year: 2011-07-07
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The brilliant new Elizabethan thriller from the highly acclaimed author of SACRED TREASON. 1564: Catholic herald William Harley, Clarenceux King of Arms, is the custodian of a highly dangerous document. When it is stolen, Clarenceux immediately suspects a group of Catholic sympathisers, the self-styled Knights of the Round Table. Francis Walsingham, the ruthless protégé of the queen's Principal Secretary, Sir William Cecil, intercepts a coded message from the Knights to a Countess known to have Catholic leanings. He is convinced that Clarenceux is trying to use the document to advance the cause of the Catholic Queen. And soon Clarenceux enters a nightmare of suspicion, deception and conspiracy. Conflict and fear, compounded by the religious doubts of the time, conceal a persistent mystery. Where has the document gone? Who has it and who really took it? And why? The roots of betrayal are deep and shocking: and Clarenceux's journey towards the truth entails not just the discovery of clues and signs, but also the discovery of himself.
The Big Con
Author: David Maurer
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 030775572X
Pages: 336
Year: 2010-10-27
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The classic 1940 study of con men and con games that Luc Sante in Salon called “a bonanza of wild but credible stories, told concisely with deadpan humor, as sly and rich in atmosphere as anything this side of Mark Twain.” “Of all the grifters, the confidence man is the aristocrat,” wrote David Maurer, a proposition he definitely proved in The Big Con, one of the most colorful, well-researched, and entertaining works of criminology ever written. A professor of linguistics who specialized in underworld argot, Maurer won the trust of hundreds of swindlers, who let him in on not simply their language but their folkways and the astonishingly complex and elaborate schemes whereby unsuspecting marks, hooked by their own greed and dishonesty, were “taken off” – i.e. cheated—of thousands upon thousands of dollars. The Big Con is a treasure trove of American lingo (the write, the rag, the payoff, ropers, shills, the cold poke, the convincer, to put on the send) and indelible characters (Yellow Kid Weil, Barney the Patch, the Seldom Seen Kid, Limehouse Chappie, Larry the Lug). It served as the source for the Oscar-winning film The Sting.
The Greatest Traitor
Author: Ian Mortimer
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1466851392
Pages: 400
Year: 2013-08-20
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One night in August 1323, a captive rebel baron, Sir Roger Mortimer, drugged his guards and escaped from the Tower of London. With the king's men-at-arms in pursuit he fled to the south coast and sailed to France. There he was joined by Isabella, the Queen of England, who threw herself into his arms. A year later, as lovers, they returned with an invading army: King Edward II's forces crumbled before them and Mortimer took power. He removed Edward II in the first deposition of a monarch in British history. Then the ex-king was apparently murdered, some said with a red-hot poker, in Berkeley Castle. Brutal, intelligent, passionate, profligate, imaginative, and violent, Sir Roger Mortimer was an extraordinary character. It is not surprising that the Queen lost her heart to him. Nor is it surprising that his contemporaries were terrified of him. But until now no one has appreciated the full evil genius of the man. This first biography, The Greatest Traitor by Ian Mortimer, reveals not only Mortimer's career as a feudal lord, a governor of Ireland, a rebel leader, and a dictator of England, but also the truth of what happened that night in Berkeley Castle.
The Stolen Luck
Author: Shawna Reppert
Publisher: Harlequin
ISBN: 1426895445
Pages:
Year: 2013-05-06
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How far will a good man go to save his home and loved ones? Lord James Dupree must recover his family's stolen Luck, the elven talisman that has protected the Dupree lands for generations. Without the talisman, the Dupree vineyards are failing and creditors are closing in. The Luck is his only hope of saving his home and his family from poverty and ruin. Despite his abhorrence of slavery, James wins an elven slave in a game of cards. The slave, Loren, provides the only chance to enter the Lands Between and recover the stolen Luck. Despite James's assurances and best intentions, Loren does not trust his new master and James finds it all too easy to slip into the role of slave master when Loren defies him. As the two work together through hardship and danger, James finds himself falling in love with Loren. And when a hidden enemy moves against them, he must choose between his responsibility to his family and his own soul. 78,000 words
Rogues' Gold
Author: John Pilkington
Publisher: Usborne Pub Limited
ISBN: 074607879X
Pages: 214
Year: 2007
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A mystery adventure story full of drama, death, intrigue and scandal, with colourful characters and an authentic historical setting. Synopsis When boy actor Ben Button's fellow players are accused of stealing the priceless Lodovico plate, he sets out to save them from the shadow of the hangman's noose. Who really stole the plate, what secret does it hide and how can Ben reveal the truth? This thrilling romp across the Elizabethan English countryside, populated by bejewelled nobility, ragged beggars, thundering horsemen and secret spies, has a charm that's impossible to resist.
Lonely Planet London
Author: Lonely Planet, Damian Harper, Peter Dragicevich, Steve Fallon, Emilie Filou
Publisher: Lonely Planet
ISBN: 1787012042
Pages:
Year: 2018-02-01
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Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher Lonely Planet London is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Explore ancient castles, modern galleries and world-class museums, catch a show on the West End, and down a pint in a traditional pub; all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of London and begin your journey now! Inside Lonely Planet London Travel Guide: Full-colour maps and images throughout Highlights and itineraries help you tailor your trip to your personal needs and interests Insider tips to save time and money and get around like a local, avoiding crowds and trouble spots Essential info at your fingertips - hours of operation, phone numbers, websites, transit tips, prices Honest reviews for all budgets - eating, sleeping, sight-seeing, going out, shopping, hidden gems that most guidebooks miss Cultural insights give you a richer, more rewarding travel experience - history, music, shopping, food, theatre Free, convenient pull-out London map (included in print version), plus over 50 colour maps Covers The City, West End, South Bank, Kensington, Notting Hill, Camden, Greenwich and more eBook Features: (Best viewed on tablet devices and smartphones) Downloadable PDF and offline maps prevent roaming and data charges Effortlessly navigate and jump between maps and reviews Add notes to personalise your guidebook experience Seamlessly flip between pages Bookmarks and speedy search capabilities get you to key pages in a flash Embedded links to recommendations' websites Zoom-in maps and images Inbuilt dictionary for quick referencing The Perfect Choice: : Lonely Planet London, our most comprehensive guide to London, is perfect for both exploring top sights and taking roads less travelled. Looking for just the highlights? Check out Lonely Planet Pocket London, a handy-sized guide focused on the can't-miss sights for a quick trip. Looking for more extensive coverage? Check out Lonely Planet England guide for a comprehensive look at all the country has to offer. About Lonely Planet: Lonely Planet is a leading travel media company and the world's number one travel guidebook brand, providing both inspiring and trustworthy information for every kind of traveller since 1973. Over the past four decades, we've printed over 145 million guidebooks and phrasebooks for 120 languages, and grown a dedicated, passionate global community of travellers. You'll also find our content online, and in mobile apps, video, 14 languages, 12 international magazines, armchair and lifestyle books, ebooks, and more, enabling you to explore every day. Lonely Planet enables the curious to experience the world fully and to truly get to the heart of the places they find themselves, near or far from home. TripAdvisor Travelers' Choice Awards 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016 winner in Favorite Travel Guide category 'Lonely Planet guides are, quite simply, like no other.' - New York Times 'Lonely Planet. It's on everyone's bookshelves; it's in every traveller's hands. It's on mobile phones. It's on the Internet. It's everywhere, and it's telling entire generations of people how to travel the world.' - Fairfax Media (Australia) Note: The digital edition of this book is missing some of the images found in the physical edition
Life in a Medieval Village
Author: Frances Gies, Joseph Gies
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062016687
Pages: 288
Year: 2010-09-07
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The reissue of Joseph and Frances Gies’s classic bestseller on life in medieval villages. This new reissue of Life in a Medieval Village, by respected historians Joseph and Frances Gies, paints a lively, convincing portrait of rural people at work and at play in the Middle Ages. Focusing on the village of Elton, in the English East Midlands, the Gieses detail the agricultural advances that made communal living possible, explain what domestic life was like for serf and lord alike, and describe the central role of the church in maintaining social harmony. Though the main focus is on Elton, c. 1300, the Gieses supply enlightening historical context on the origin, development, and decline of the European village, itself an invention of the Middle Ages. Meticulously researched, Life in a Medieval Village is a remarkable account that illustrates the captivating world of the Middle Ages and demonstrates what it was like to live during a fascinating—and often misunderstood—era.