The Peregrine New York Review Books Classics Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

The Peregrine
Author: John Alec Baker
Publisher: New York Review of Books
ISBN: 1590171330
Pages: 191
Year: 2005
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A memoir of life in the wild on the trail of the peregrine falcon chronicles the habits and hunting techniques of the elusive predator while revealing the effects of human encroachment on their habitats. Original.
The Peregrine
Author: J. A. Baker
Publisher: William Collins
ISBN: 0008138311
Pages: 432
Year: 2015-03-26
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Reissue of J. A. Baker s extraordinary classic of British nature writing Despite the association of peregrines with the wild, outer reaches of the British Isles, The Peregrine is set on the flat marshes of the Essex coast, where J A Baker spent a long winter looking and writing about the visitors from the uplands peregrines that spend the winter hunting the huge flocks of pigeons and waders that share the desolate landscape with them. Including original diaries from which The Peregrine was written and its companion volume The Hill of Summer, this is a beautiful compendium of lyrical nature writing at its absolute best. Such luminaries as Richard Mabey, Robert Macfarlane, Ted Hughes and Andrew Motion have cited this as one of the most important books in 20th Century nature writing, and the bestselling author Mark Cocker has provided an introduction on the importance of Baker, his writings and the diaries creating the essential volume of Baker's writings. Papers, maps, and letters have recently come to light which in turn provide a little more background into J A Baker s history. Contemporaries particularly from his time at school in Chelmsford have provided insights, remembering a school friend who clearly made an impact on his generation. Among fragments of letters to Baker was one from a reader who praised a piece that Baker had written in RSPB Birds magazine in 1971. Apart from a paper on peregrines which Baker wrote for the Essex Bird Report, this article entitled On the Essex Coast appears to be his only other published piece of writing, and, with the agreement of the RSPB, it has been included in this updated new paperback edition of Baker s astounding work."
The Peregrine
Author: J. A. Baker
Publisher: HarperCollins UK
ISBN: 0007395906
Pages: 432
Year: 2011-06-09
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The Peregrine, which won the Duff Cooper Prize in 1967, recounts a single year from the author's ten–year obsession with the peregrines that wintered near his home in eastern England. The writing is lyrically charged throughout, as the author's role of diligent observer gives way to a personal transformation, as Baker becomes, in the words of James Dickey, "a fusion of man and bird."
Nyrb Classics 10th Anniversary Complete Collection
Author: RANDOM HOUSE INC, Various, New York Review Book
Publisher: NYRB Classics
ISBN: 1590173570
Pages:
Year: 2009-10-27
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The NYRB Classics series is designedly and determinedly exploratory and eclectic, a mix of fiction and non-fiction from different eras and times and of various sorts. The series includes nineteenth century novels and experimental novels, reportage and belles lettres, tell-all memoirs and learned studies, established classics and cult favorites, literature high, low, unsuspected, and unheard of. NYRB Classics are, to a large degree, discoveries, the kind of books that people typically run into outside of the classroom and then remember for life. Inevitably literature in translation constitutes a major part of the NYRB Classics series, simply because so much great literature has been left untranslated into English, or translated poorly, or deserves to be translated again, much as any outstanding book asks to be read again. The series started in 1999 with the publication of Richard Hughes's A High Wind in Jamaica. NYRB Classics includes new translations of canonical figures such as Euripides, Dante, Balzac, and Chekhov; fiction by modern and contemporary masters such as Vasily Grossman, Mavis Gallant, Daphne du Maurier, Stefan Zweig, and Upamanyu Chatterjee; tales of crime and punishment by George Simenon and Kenneth Fearing; masterpieces of narrative history and literary criticism, poetry, travel writing, biography, cookbooks, and memoirs from such writers as Norman Mailer, Lionel Trilling, and Patrick Leigh Fermor; and unclassifiable classics on the order of J. R. Ackerley's My Dog Tulip and Robert Burton's The Anatomy of Melancholy. Fall 2009 sees the publication of the series' first graphic novel, Poem Strip by Dino Buzzati, translated into English for the first time. Published in handsome uniform trade paperback editions, almost all the 250 NYRB Classics included in this collection feature an introduction by an outstanding writer, scholar, or critic of our day. Taken as a whole, NYRB Classics may be considered a series of books of unrivaled variety and quality for discerning and adventurous readers. This collection includes one each of the following titles: A High Wind in Jamaica by Richard Hughes Jakob von Gunten by Robert Walser The Living Thoughts of Kierkegaard by Soren Kierkegaard Lolly Willowes by Sylvia Townsend Warner My Dog Tulip by J.R. Ackerley My Father and Myself by J.R. Ackerley The Other House by Henry James Peasants and Other Stories by Anton Chekhov Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist by Alexander Berkman A Handbook on Hanging by Charles Duff Hindoo Holiday by J.R. Ackerley Memoirs of My Nervous Illness by Daniel Paul Schreber The Wooden Shepherdess by Richard Hughes The Stories of J.F. Powers by J.F. Powers Memoirs of Lorenzo Da Ponte by Lorenzo Da Ponte Morte D'Urban by J.F. Powers Records of Shelley, Byron, and the Author by Edward John Trelawny Wheat that Springeth Green by J.F. Powers Classic Crimes by William Roughead The Lore and Language of Schoolchildren by Iona Opie The Unknown Masterpiece by Honore de Balzac Virgin Soil by Ivan Turgenev The Glass Bees by Ernst Junger The Pure and the Impure by Colette The Waste Books by Georg Christoph Lichtenberg A Month in the Country by J.L. Carr Seven Men by Max Beerbohm To Each His Own by Leonardo Sciascia The Wine-Dark Sea by Leonardo Sciascia Alfred and Guinevere by James Schuyler The Pilgrim Hawk by Glenway Wescott The Fox in the Attic by Richard Hughes The Haunted Looking Glass by Edward Gorey A House and Its Head by Ivy Compton-Burnett Manservant and Maidservant by Ivy Compton-Burnett Hadrian the Seventh by Fr. Rolfe Madame de Pompadour by Nancy Mitford The Quest for Corvo by A.J.A. Symons The Root and the Flower by L.H. Myers The Anatomy of Melancholy by Robert Burton Exploits and Adventures of Brigadier Gerard by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Letty Fox by Christina Stead The Golovlyov Family by Shchedrin The Radiance of the King by Camara Laye Eustace and Hilda by L.P. Hartley Seduction and Betrayal by Elizabeth Hardwick Sleepless Nights by Elizabeth Hardwick A Way of Life, Like Any Other by Darcy O'Brien As a Man Grows Older by Italo Svevo Autobiography of an Unknown Indian by Nirad C. Chaudhuri Renoir, My Father by Jean Renoir An African in Greenland by Tete-Michel Kpomassie Letters: Summer 1926 by Boris Pasternak Mr. Fortune' s Maggot by Sylvia Townsend Warner Selected Works of Cesare Pavese by Cesare Pavese The Life of Henry Brulard by Stendhal On the Yard by Malcolm Braly Selected Stories of Robert Walser by Robert Walser The Adventures and Misadventures of Maqroll by Alvaro Mutis Mawrdew Czgowchwz by James McCourt The Go-Between by L.P. Hartley The Outcry by Henry James A Book of Mediterranean Food by Elizabeth David Letters from Russia by Astolphe De Custine Miserable Miracle by Henri Michaux Riders in the Chariot by Patrick White Summer Cooking by Elizabeth David Corrigan by Caroline Blackwood Great Granny Webster by Caroline Blackwood Mary Olivier by May Sinclair Randall Jarrell's Book of Stories by Randall Jarrell The New Life by Dante Alighieri The Ten Thousand Things by Maria Dermout The Unpossessed by Tess Slesinger The Middle of the Journey by Lionel Trilling The World of Odysseus by M.I. Finley The Book of My Life by Girolamo Cardano The Moon and the Bonfires by Cesare Pavese Paris Stories by Mavis Gallant Troubles by J.G. Farrell In the Freud Archives by Janet Malcolm The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner by James Hogg A Sorrow Beyond Dreams by Peter Handke The Fountain Overflows by Rebecca West Prisoner of Love by Jean Genet We Always Treat Women Too Well by Raymond Queneau Witch Grass by Raymond Queneau The Stuffed Owl by D.B. Wyndham Lewis To the Finland Station by Edmund Wilson The Vet's Daughter by Barbara Comyns Walter Benjamin by Gershom Scholem Fancies and Goodnights by John Collier Shelley: The Pursuit by Richard Holmes In Parenthesis by David Jones Peking Story by David Kidd Rene Leys by Victor Segalen Black Sun by Geoffrey Wolff Dirty Snow by Georges Simenon The Invention of Morel by Adolfo Bioy Casares The Day of the Owl by Leonardo Sciascia Equal Danger by Leonardo Sciascia Monsieur Proust by Celeste Albaret Three Bedrooms in Manhattan by Georges Simenon The Tenants of Moonbloom by Edward Lewis Wallant The Towers of Trebizond by Rose MacAulay Varieties of Exile by Mavis Gallant My Century by Aleksander Wat The World I Live In by Helen Keller American Humor by Constance Rourke The Ivory Tower by Henry James The Gallery by John Horne Burns Paris and Elsewhere by Richard Cobb Apartment in Athens by Glenway Wescott Envy by Yuri Olesha The Moro Affair by Leonardo Sciascia Nights in the Gardens of Brooklyn by Harvey Swados Part of Our Time by Murray Kempton The Case of Comrade Tulayev by Victor Serge Boredom by Alberto Moravia Contempt by Alberto Moravia The Diary of a Rapist by Evan S. Connell Monsieur Monde Vanishes by Georges Simenon The Siege of Krishnapur by J.G. Farrell W. H. Auden's Book of Light Verse by W. H. Auden Asleep in the Sun by Adolfo Bioy Casares The Bog People by P.V. Glob Moravagine by Blaise Cendrars The Selected Poems of Osip Mandelstam by Osip Mandelstam Cassandra at the Wedding by Dorothy Baker The Furies by Janet Hobhouse Hons and Rebels by Jessica Mitford Indian Summer by William Dean Howells Memoirs of Hecate County by Edmund Wilson The Inferno of Dante Alighieri by Dante Alighieri The Year of the French by Thomas Flanagan Flaubert and Madame Bovary by Francis Steegmuller The Late Mattia Pascal by Luigi Pirandello The Life of Lazarillo de Tormes by W.S. Merwin The Peregrine by J.A. Baker Blood on the Forge by William Attaway The Child by Jules Valles The Lord Chandos Letter by Hugo Von Hofmannsthal The Singapore Grip by J.G. Farrell Count D'Orgel's Ball by Raymond Radiguet War and the Iliad by Simone Weil Anglo-Saxon Attitudes by Angus Wilson The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual by Harold Cruse Kaputt by Curzio Malaparte Memed, My Hawk by Yashar Kemal The Notebooks of Joseph Joubert by Joseph Joubert The Thirty Years War by C.V. Wedgwood Shakespeare by Mark Van Doren The Stalin Front by Gert Ledig Tropic Moon by Georges Simenon Between the Woods and the Water by Patrick Leigh Fermor A Time of Gifts by Patrick Leigh Fermor Jejuri by Arun Kolatkar The Man Who Watched Trains Go By by Georges Simenon Mouchette by Georges Bernanos Warlock by Oakley Hall The New York Stories of Henry James by Henry James Chess Story by Stefan Zweig What's for Dinner? by James Schuyler English, August by Upamanyu Chatterjee Conundrum by Jan Morris Life and Fate by Vasily Grossman Mani by Patrick Leigh Fermor Roumeli by Patrick Leigh Fermor Beware of Pity by Stefan Zweig Stoner by John Williams The Big Clock by Kenneth Fearing Red Lights by Georges Simenon The Jeffersonian Transformation by Henry Adams Love in a Fallen City by Eileen Chang A Savage War of Peace by Alistair Horne Clark Gifford's Body by Kenneth Fearing The Strangers in the House by Georges Simenon Pages from the Goncourt Journals by Edmond and Jules de Goncourt They Burn the Thistles by Yashar Kemal Born Under Saturn by Rudolf and Margot Wittkower The Stray Dog Cabaret by Edited by Honor Moore and Catherine Ciepiela Butcher's Crossing by John Williams Dante by Erich Auerbach The Slaves of Solitude by Patrick Hamilton That Awful Mess on the Via Merulana by Carlo Emilio Gadda The Engagement by Georges Simenon The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim The Slynx by Tatyana Tolstaya White Walls by Tatyana Tolstaya Memoirs of Montparnasse by John Glassco The Dud Avocado by Elaine Dundy The Education Of A Gardener by Russell Page The Book of Ebenezer Le Page by G. B. Edwards Sunflower by Gyula Krudy Novels in Three Lines by Felix Feneon The Goshawk by T. H. White The New York Stories of Edith Wharton by Edith Wharton A Time to Keep Silence by Patrick Leigh Fermor All About H. Hatterr by G. V. Desani Rogue Male by Geoffrey Household Memoirs of an Anti-Semite by Gregor von Rezzori Soul by Andrey Platonov Sheppard Lee, Written by Himself by Robert Montgomery Bird Poems of the Late T'ang by A. C. Graham Twenty Thousand Streets Under the Sky by Patrick Hamilton Unforgiving Years by Victor Serge Belchamber by Howard Sturgis A Journey Round My Skull by Frigyes Karinthy The Widow by Georges Simenon The Post-Office Girl by Stefan Zweig Afloat by Guy de Maupassant The Family Mashber by Der Nister The Summer Book by Tove Jansson Names on the Land by George R. Stewart Miami and the Siege of Chicago by Norman Mailer Inverted World by Christopher Priest My Fantoms by Theophile Gautier Stones of Aran: Pilgrimage by Tim Robinson In Hazard by Richard Hughes Victorine by Maude Hutchins Grief Lessons by Euripides Rock Crystal by Adalbert Stifter The Liberal Imagination by Lionel Trilling The Queue by Vladimir Sorokin Ringolevio by Emmett Grogan Defeat: Napoleon’s Russian Campaign by Philippe-Paul de Segur Don't Look Now by Daphne Du Maurier The Chrysalids by John Wyndham Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi The Snows of Yesteryear by Gregor von Rezzori The Rider on the White Horse by Theodor Storm School for Love by Olivia Manning Chaos and Night by Henry de Montherlant A Meaningful Life by L. J. Davis Short Letter, Long Farewell by Peter Handke Slow Homecoming by Peter Handke Season of Migration to the North by Tayeb Salih The Foundation Pit by Andrey Platonov The Complete Fiction by Francis Wyndham The One-Straw Revolution by Masanobu Fukuoka The Old Man and Me by Elaine Dundy Summer Will Show by Syliva Townsend Warner Niki by Tibor Dery Hard Rain Falling by Don Carpenter Stones of Aran: Labyrinth by Tim Robinson The Cost of Living by Mavis Gallant Memories of the Future by Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky Poem Strip by Dino Buzzati No Tomorrow by Vivant Denon The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier
Peregrine
Author: William Bayer
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 0765311623
Pages: 304
Year: 2005-06-01
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Witnessing and reporting the murder of a young woman by a trained peregrine falcon, newscaster Pamela Barrett captures the attention of the bird's owner, who enmeshes her in a deadly scheme that culminates in multiple killings, a falcon fight to the death, and a demand for rare birds on the black market. Simultaneous.
The Adventures of Sindbad
Author: Gyula Krudy
Publisher: New York Review of Books
ISBN: 1590174666
Pages: 240
Year: 2011-11-08
View: 671
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“What you have loved remains yours.” Thus speaks the irresistible rogue Sindbad, ironic hero of these fantastic tales, who has seduced and abandoned countless women over the course of centuries but never lost one, for he returns to visit them all—ladies, actresses, housemaids—in his memories and dreams. From the bustling streets of Budapest to small provincial towns where nothing ever seems to change, this ghostly Lothario encounters his old flames wherever he goes: along the banks of the Danube; under windows where they once courted; in churches and in graveyards, where Eros and Thanatos tryst. Lies, bad behavior, and fickleness of all kinds are forgiven, and love is reaffirmed as the only thing worth persevering for, weeping for, and living for. The Adventures of Sindbad is the Hungarian master Gyula Krúdy’s most famous book, an uncanny evocation of the autumn of the Hapsburg Empire that is enormously popular not only in Hungary but throughout Eastern Europe.
Nature Stories
Author: Jules Renard
Publisher: 2Language Books
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 2018-10-12
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Nature Stories: English & French · The English text has been translated from the French. · The French text has been re-worked. · Contains commentaries on some parts of the text. · Contains a summary of French grammar. · Contains a Translation Skills Test (with Grammar tips). · Can be read in ‘English to French’; ‘French to English’; ‘English’; or ‘French’. THIS EDITION: Nature Stories (in French, Histoires naturelles) is a classic French book written by Jules Renard. It contains a collection of short commentaries on the natural world, and man’s place in it. Renard’s style and succinctness immediately brings to mind the Japanese haiku. This volume includes an introductory section summarising the important aspects of French grammar. The digital edition also contains a translation skills test. (Includes verb conjugation and other grammar hints.) The dual-language text has been arranged into small bilingual snippets for quick and easy cross-referencing. The content is ideal for assisting the intermediate language learner to transition to foreign language only content. Also, if the content is too difficult, there is other material put out by 2Langauge Books that can help. The reader can choose between six options: Section 1: English to French Section 2: French to English Section 3: English Section 4: French Section 5: English to French Skills Test Section 6: French to English Skills Test The eventual aim is to read with a comfortable level of understanding only in the foreign language. If you are a beginner, read the native language snippet first. If you are at an intermediate level, read the foreign language snippet first. The advanced level is like the beginners level, except you have to try and figure out the foreign language text, instead of having it provided. One way to do this is to cover the foreign text snippet. In the digital edition, you can take an intermediate or advanced level skills test. Many basic language books offer some form of audio support. Internet services — primarily news based radio stations — offer podcasts. Audio from television is an additional resource, and can be formatted for use on various digital platforms. However, if audio is an important component of your interest in languages, electronic devices that support quality text-to-speech (TTS) will likely be appealing. With a library card, TTS technology (in a device that supports the relevant content), and the above mentioned resources (as digital content), an entire language learning system is available for not much more than a cup of coffee! There is no substantial financial outlay to get you started. Furthermore, there are no additional ongoing fees (and updates), and there are no expiry dates on ‘premium’ content and resources. (A Dual-Language Book Project) 2Language Books
Shakespeare
Author: Mark Van Doren
Publisher: New York Review of Books
ISBN: 1590171683
Pages: 302
Year: 1939
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This legendary book by an esteemed poet and beloved professor at Columbia University features a series of smart, witty, deeply perceptive essays about each of Shakespeare's plays, together with a further discussion of the poems. Writing with an incomparable knowledge of his subject but without a hint of pedantry, Van Doren elucidates both the astonishing boldness and myriad subtleties of Shakespeare's protean art. His Shakespeare is a book to be treasured by both new and longtime students of the Bard.
The Goshawk
Author: T.H. White
Publisher: New York Review of Books
ISBN: 1590175468
Pages: 240
Year: 2012-04-25
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The predecessor to Helen Macdonald’s H is for Hawk, T. H. White’s nature writing classic, The Goshawk, asks the age-old question: what is it that binds human beings to other animals? White, the author of The Once and Future King and Mistress Masham’s Repose, was a young writer who found himself rifling through old handbooks of falconry. A particular sentence—”the bird reverted to a feral state”—seized his imagination, and, White later wrote, “A longing came to my mind that I should be able to do this myself. The word ‘feral’ has a kind of magical potency which allied itself to two other words, ‘ferocious’ and ‘free.’” Immediately, White wrote to Germany to acquire a young goshawk. Gos, as White named the bird, was ferocious and Gos was free, and White had no idea how to break him in beyond the ancient (and, though he did not know it, long superseded) practice of depriving him of sleep, which meant that he, White, also went without rest. Slowly man and bird entered a state of delirium and intoxication, of attraction and repulsion that looks very much like love. White kept a daybook describing his volatile relationship with Gos—at once a tale of obsession, a comedy of errors, and a hymn to the hawk. It was this that became The Goshawk, one of modern literature’s most memorable and surprising encounters with the wilderness—as it exists both within us and without.
Memories of the Future
Author: Sigizmund Krzhizhanovskiĭ, Joanne Turnbull
Publisher: New York Review of Books
ISBN: 1590173198
Pages: 228
Year: 2009
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Written in Soviet Moscow in the 1920s—but considered too subversive even to show to a publisher—the seven tales included here attest to Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky’s boundless imagination, black humor, and breathtaking irony: a man loses his way in the vast black waste of his own small room; the Eiffel Tower runs amok; a kind soul dreams of selling “everything you need for suicide”; an absentminded passenger boards the wrong train, winding up in a place where night is day, nightmares are the reality, and the backs of all facts have been broken; a man out looking for work comes across a line for logic but doesn’t join it as there’s no guarantee the logic will last; a sociable corpse misses his own funeral; an inventor gets a glimpse of the far-from-radiant communist future.
A Journey Round My Skull
Author: Frigyes Karinthy, Oliver W. Sacks, Vernon Duckworth Barker
Publisher: New York Review of Books
ISBN: 1590172582
Pages: 288
Year: 2008
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The distinguished Hungarian author Frigyes Karinthy was sitting in a Budapest café, wondering whether to write a long-planned monograph on modern man or a new play, when he was disturbed by the roaring—so loud as to drown out all other noises—of a passing train. Soon it was gone, only to be succeeded by another. And another. Strange, Karinthy thought, it had been years since Budapest had streetcars. Only then did he realize he was suffering from an auditory hallucination of extraordinary intensity. What in fact Karinthy was suffering from was a brain tumor, not cancerous but hardly benign, though it was only much later—after spells of giddiness, fainting fits, friends remarking that his handwriting had altered, and books going blank before his eyes—that he consulted a doctor and embarked on a series of examinations that would lead to brain surgery. Karinthy’s description of his descent into illness and his observations of his symptoms, thoughts, and feelings, as well as of his friends’ and doctors’ varied responses to his predicament, are exact and engrossing and entirely free of self-pity. A Journey Round My Skull is not only an extraordinary piece of medical testimony, but a powerful work of literature—one that dances brilliantly on the edge of extinction.
The Stammering Century
Author: Gilbert Seldes
Publisher: New York Review of Books
ISBN: 1590175956
Pages: 452
Year: 2012-11-06
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Gilbert Seldes, the author of The Stammering Century, writes: This book is not a record of the major events in Ameri­can history during the nineteenth century. It is concerned with minor movements, with the cults and manias of that period. Its personages are fanatics, and radicals, and mountebanks. Its intention is to connect these secondary movements and figures with the primary forces of the century, and to supply a back- ground in American history for the Prohibitionists and the Pente­costalists; the diet-faddists and the dealers in mail-order Personality; the play censors and the Fundamen­talists; the free-lovers and eugenists; the cranks and possibly the saints. Sects, cults, manias, movements, fads, religious excitements, and the relation of each of these to the others and to the orderly progress of America are the subject. The subject is of course as timely at the beginning of the twenty-first century as when the book first appeared in 1928. Seldes’s fascinated and often sympathetic accounts of dreamers, rogues, frauds, sectarians, madmen, and geniuses from Jonathan Edwards to the messianic murderer Matthias have established The Stammering Century not only as a lasting contribution to American history but as a classic in its own right.
Talk
Author: Linda Rosenkrantz
Publisher: New York Review of Books
ISBN: 1590178459
Pages: 240
Year: 2015-07-07
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Talk is a hilariously irreverent and racy testament to dialogue: the gossip, questioning, analysis, arguments, and revelations that make up our closest friendships. It’s the summer of 1965 and Emily, Vincent, and Marsha are at the beach. All three are ambitious and artistic; all are hovering around thirty; and all are deeply and mercilessly invested in analyzing themselves and everyone around them. The friends discuss sex, shrinks, psychedelics, sculpture, and S and M in an ongoing dialogue where anything goes and no topic is off limits. Talk is the result of these conversations, recorded by Linda Rosenkrantz and transformed into a novel whose form and content put it well ahead of its time. Controversial upon its first publication in 1968, Talk remains fresh, lascivious, and laugh-out-loud funny nearly fifty years later.
The Invisibility Cloak
Author: Ge Fei
Publisher: New York Review of Books
ISBN: 1681370212
Pages: 120
Year: 2016-10-11
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An NYRB Classics Original The hero of The Invisibility Cloak lives in contemporary Beijing—where everyone is doing their best to hustle up the ladder of success while shouldering an ever-growing burden of consumer goods—and he’s a loser. Well into his forties, he’s divorced (and still doting on his ex), childless, and living with his sister (her husband wants him out) in an apartment at the edge of town with a crack in the wall the wind from the north blows through while he gets by, just, by making customized old-fashioned amplifiers for the occasional rich audio-obsessive. He has contempt for his clients and contempt for himself. The only things he really likes are Beethoven and vintage speakers. Then an old friend tips him off about a special job—a little risky but just don’t ask too many questions—and can it really be that this hopeless loser wins? This provocative and seriously funny exercise in the social fantastic by the brilliantly original Ge Fei, one of China’s finest living writers, is among the most original works of fiction to come out of China in recent years. It is sure to appeal to readers of Haruki Murakami and other fabulists of contemporary irreality.
A View of the Harbour
Author: Elizabeth Taylor
Publisher: New York Review of Books
ISBN: 1590178491
Pages: 320
Year: 2015-06-02
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Blindness and betrayal are Elizabeth Taylor’s great subjects, and in A View of the Harbour she turns her unsparing gaze on the emotional and sexual politics of a seedy seaside town that’s been left behind by modernity. Tory, recently divorced, depends more and more on the company of her neighbors Robert, a doctor, and Beth, a busy author of melodramatic novels. Prudence, Robert and Beth’s daughter, disapproves of the intimacy that has grown between her parents and Tory and the gossip it has awakened in their little community. As the novel proceeds, Taylor’s view widens to take in a range of characters from bawdy, nosey Mrs. Bracey; to a widowed young proprietor of the local waxworks, Lily Wilson; to the would-be artist Bertram—while the book as a whole offers a beautifully observed and written examination of the fictions around which we construct our lives and manage our losses.