Naming And Taming Overwhelm For Healthcare Human Service Providers English Edition Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Naming and Taming Overwhelm
Author: Sarri Gilman
Publisher:
ISBN: 0989778746
Pages:
Year: 2017-02-12
View: 439
Read: 613
Published by Healthy Gen Media. If you work in health and human services, you know how susceptible you and your colleagues are to stress and compassion fatigue. The risk factors and occurrences of becoming overwhelmed are widespread and systemic. However, the industry generally addresses only the symptoms, rather than treating the problem holistically. Naming and Taming Overwhelm, by Sarri Gilman, will help you recognize if or when you're becoming overwhelmed and provide simple steps to protect and care for yourself. Learn how to tune into your own personal signals as well as develop techniques for listening to and helping your colleagues who may experience their own early signs of feeling overwhelmed.
Transform Your Boundaries
Author: Sarri Gilman
Publisher:
ISBN: 098977872X
Pages: 192
Year: 2014-04
View: 791
Read: 1016
Your boundaries are doing only one thing - trying to take care of you. This book provides easy to follow examples and a step by step process to let your boundaries do their job. It is based on tried and true methods developed to help people working on boundary issues. The book provides a way to apply the information to your own life to deal with the emotions, stress, extreme challenges to your boundaries, and how to really do self-care.
How to Survive a Plague
Author: David France
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307745430
Pages: 656
Year: 2017-10-03
View: 1085
Read: 413
"A history of AIDS activism in New York in the early years of the plague"...
How to Tame a Human Tornado
Author: Paul Tobin
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1619639009
Pages: 272
Year: 2018-03-06
View: 1270
Read: 1260
The adventures continue for sixth-grade genius inventor Nate Bannister and his best friend Delphine in the third book of The Genius Factor series. It's Friday the 13th again, and Nate hasn't just done one really outrageous thing. He hasn't even done THREE crazy things like normal. No, this time he's gone and hidden his science vials full of his inventions throughout the town of Polt. He's trying to avoid the Red Death Tea Society as always, who continue to hunt him down. They know where Nate lives now, so his only choice is to conceal his experiments in places they wouldn't think to look. But things are about to go very, very wrong, including: an overwhelming amount of toads in Polt, zebras running wild, and lightning storms that won't quit. Nate and Delphine have been in lots of trouble before, but this is their most disastrous Friday the 13th yet . . . and we can't promise a happy ending quite yet.
Designing Healthcare That Works
Author: Mark Ackerman, Michael Prilla, Christian Stary, Thomas Herrmann, Sean Goggins
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 0128125845
Pages: 232
Year: 2017-11-17
View: 1005
Read: 627
Designing Healthcare That Works: A Sociotechnical Approach takes up the pragmatic, messy problems of designing and implementing sociotechnical solutions which integrate organizational and technical systems for the benefit of human health. The book helps practitioners apply principles of sociotechnical design in healthcare and consider the adoption of new theories of change. As practitioners need new processes and tools to create a more systematic alignment between technical mechanisms and social structures in healthcare, the book helps readers recognize the requirements of this alignment. The systematic understanding developed within the book’s case studies includes new ways of designing and adopting sociotechnical systems in healthcare. For example, helping practitioners examine the role of exogenous factors, like CMS Systems in the U.S. Or, more globally, helping practitioners consider systems external to the boundaries drawn around a particular healthcare IT system is one key to understand the design challenge. Written by scholars in the realm of sociotechnical systems research, the book is a valuable source for medical informatics professionals, software designers and any healthcare providers who are interested in making changes in the design of the systems. Encompasses case studies focusing on specific projects and covering an entire lifecycle of sociotechnical design in healthcare Provides an in-depth view from established scholars in the realm of sociotechnical systems research and related domains Brings a systematic understanding that includes ways of designing and adopting sociotechnical systems in healthcare
Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers
Author: Robert M. Sapolsky
Publisher: Holt Paperbacks
ISBN: 1429935650
Pages: 560
Year: 2004-09-15
View: 355
Read: 669
Renowned primatologist Robert Sapolsky offers a completely revised and updated edition of his most popular work, with over 225,000 copies in print Now in a third edition, Robert M. Sapolsky's acclaimed and successful Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers features new chapters on how stress affects sleep and addiction, as well as new insights into anxiety and personality disorder and the impact of spirituality on managing stress. As Sapolsky explains, most of us do not lie awake at night worrying about whether we have leprosy or malaria. Instead, the diseases we fear-and the ones that plague us now-are illnesses brought on by the slow accumulation of damage, such as heart disease and cancer. When we worry or experience stress, our body turns on the same physiological responses that an animal's does, but we do not resolve conflict in the same way-through fighting or fleeing. Over time, this activation of a stress response makes us literally sick. Combining cutting-edge research with a healthy dose of good humor and practical advice, Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers explains how prolonged stress causes or intensifies a range of physical and mental afflictions, including depression, ulcers, colitis, heart disease, and more. It also provides essential guidance to controlling our stress responses. This new edition promises to be the most comprehensive and engaging one yet.
Healthcare Information Management Systems
Author: Charlotte A. Weaver, Marion J. Ball, George R. Kim, Joan M. Kiel
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319207652
Pages: 618
Year: 2015-09-21
View: 464
Read: 202
Healthcare Information Management Systems, 4th edition, is a comprehensive volume addressing the technical, organizational and management issues confronted by healthcare professionals in the selection, implementation and management of healthcare information systems. With contributions from experts in the field, this book focuses on topics such as strategic planning, turning a plan into reality, implementation, patient-centered technologies, privacy, the new culture of patient safety and the future of technologies in progress. With the addition of many new chapters, the 4th Edition is also richly peppered with case studies of implementation. The case studies are evidence that information technology can be implemented efficiently to yield results, yet they do not overlook pitfalls, hurdles, and other challenges that are encountered. Designed for use by physicians, nurses, nursing and medical directors, department heads, CEOs, CFOs, CIOs, COOs, and healthcare informaticians, the book aims to be a indispensible reference.
An Anthropology of Biomedicine
Author: Margaret Lock, Vinh-Kim Nguyen
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119069130
Pages: 560
Year: 2018-03-20
View: 638
Read: 1239
"Edition History: Margaret Lock and Vinh-Kim Nguyen (1e, 2010) published by Blackwell Ltd."--T.p. verso.
The Healing of America
Author: T. R. Reid
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143118218
Pages: 290
Year: 2010
View: 605
Read: 238
A best-selling author guides a whirlwind tour of successful health-care systems worldwide, disproving American myths of "socialized medicine" to find possible paths toward reform. Reprint.
The Genius Factor: How to Capture an Invisible Cat
Author: Paul Tobin
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1408869985
Pages: 272
Year: 2016-04-07
View: 766
Read: 1204
Every Friday the 13th, 6th-grade genius Nate Bannister does three not-so-smart things to keep life interesting. This time, he taught a caterpillar to read, mailed a love letter, and super-sized his cat Proton before turning him invisible. Now Proton is on the loose, and Nate and his new friend Delphine must reverse the experiment before the cat crushes everything and everybody in town. As if that's not enough, the Red Death Tea Society, known for its criminal activity, killer tactics, and tea-brewing skills, is plotting against Nate and Delphine. The dynamic duo must use their creativity, courage and friendship to save the day. Paul Tobin blends wacky humour and chaotic high jinks in this rip-roaring, action-packed middle-grade debut;perfect for fans of David Walliams and Tom Gates.
Waking the Tiger
Author: Peter A. Levine
Publisher: North Atlantic Books
ISBN: 155643233X
Pages: 274
Year: 1997
View: 1198
Read: 609
A straightforward and drug-free approach to dealing with trauma and behavioral disorders, this book presents simple "first aid" tools to help prevent traumatic reactions from developing in the aftermath of "overwhelm" and injury. Thoroughly investigated, this work is based upon the author's years of work with numerous stress and trauma victims. Illustrations.
The Design of Everyday Things
Author: Don Norman
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465072992
Pages: 384
Year: 2013-11-05
View: 243
Read: 1236
The ultimate guide to human-centered design Even the smartest among us can feel inept as we fail to figure out which light switch or oven burner to turn on, or whether to push, pull, or slide a door. The fault, argues this ingenious-even liberating-book, lies not in ourselves, but in product design that ignores the needs of users and the principles of cognitive psychology. The problems range from ambiguous and hidden controls to arbitrary relationships between controls and functions, coupled with a lack of feedback or other assistance and unreasonable demands on memorization. The Design of Everyday Things shows that good, usable design is possible. The rules are simple: make things visible, exploit natural relationships that couple function and control, and make intelligent use of constraints. The goal: guide the user effortlessly to the right action on the right control at the right time. The Design of Everyday Things is a powerful primer on how--and why--some products satisfy customers while others only frustrate them.
Better EHR
Author: Jiajie Zhang (Professor of biomedical informatics), Muhammad Walji
Publisher:
ISBN: 0692262962
Pages: 384
Year: 2014-10-01
View: 1077
Read: 963
Electronic Health Records (EHR) offer great potential to increase healthcare efficiency, improve patient safety, and reduce health costs. The adoption of EHRs among office-based physicians in the US has increased from 20% ten years ago to over 80% in 2014. Among acute care hospitals in US, the adoption rate today is approaching 100%. Finding relevant patient information in electronic health records' (EHRs) large datasets is difficult, especially when organized only by data type and time. Automated clinical summarization creates condition-specific displays, promising improved clinician efficiency. However, automated summarization requires new kinds of clinical knowledge (e.g., problem-medication relationships).
Human Nature in Politics
Author: Graham Wallas
Publisher: 谷月社
ISBN:
Pages: 130
Year: 2015-11-26
View: 397
Read: 1202
At first sight the main controversy as to the best form of government appears to have been finally settled in favour of representative democracy. Forty years ago it could still be argued that to base the sovereignty of a great modern nation upon a widely extended popular vote was, in Europe at least, an experiment which had never been successfully tried. England, indeed, by the 'leap in the dark' of 1867, became for the moment the only large European State whose government was democratic and representative. But to-day a parliamentary republic based upon universal suffrage exists in France without serious opposition or protest. Italy enjoys an apparently stable constitutional monarchy. Universal suffrage has just been enacted in Austria. Even the German Emperor after the election of 1907 spoke of himself rather as the successful leader of a popular electoral campaign than as the inheritor of a divine right. The vast majority of the Russian nation passionately desires a sovereign parliament, and a reactionary Duma finds itself steadily pushed by circumstances towards that position. The most ultramontane Roman Catholics demand temporal power for the Pope, no longer as an ideal system of world government, but as an expedient for securing in a few square miles of Italian territory liberty of action for the directors of a church almost all of whose members will remain voting citizens of constitutional States. None of the proposals for a non-representative democracy which were associated with the communist and anarchist movements of the nineteenth century have been at all widely accepted, or have presented themselves as a definite constructive scheme; and almost all those who now hope for a social change by which the results of modern scientific industry shall be more evenly distributed put their trust in the electoral activity of the working classes. And yet, in the very nations which have most whole-heartedly accepted representative democracy, politicians and political students seem puzzled and disappointed by their experience of it. The United States of America have made in this respect by far the longest and most continuous experiment. Their constitution has lasted for a century and a quarter, and, in spite of controversy and even war arising from opposing interpretations of its details, its principles have been, and still are, practically unchallenged. But, as far as an English visitor can judge, no American thinks with satisfaction of the electoral 'machine' whose power alike in Federal, State, and Municipal politics is still increasing. In England not only has our experience of representative democracy been much shorter than that of America, but our political traditions have tended to delay the full acceptance of the democratic idea even in the working of democratic institutions. Yet, allowing for differences of degree and circumstance, one finds in England among the most loyal democrats, if they have been brought into close contact with the details of electoral organisation, something of the same disappointment which has become more articulate in America. I have helped to fight a good many parliamentary contests, and have myself been a candidate in a series of five London municipal elections. In my last election I noticed that two of my canvassers, when talking over the day's work, used independently the phrase, 'It is a queer business.' I have heard much the same words used in England by those professional political agents whose efficiency depends on their seeing electoral facts without illusion. I have no first-hand knowledge of German or Italian electioneering, but when a year ago I talked with my hosts of the Paris Municipal Council, I seemed to detect in some of them indications of good-humoured disillusionment with regard to the working of a democratic electoral system.
Where to Draw the Line
Author: Anne Katherine
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439148090
Pages: 288
Year: 2012-09-25
View: 742
Read: 980
From the acclaimed author of the perennial favorite Boundaries, Where to Draw the Line is a practical guide to establishing and maintaining healthy boundaries in many different situations. With every encounter, we either demonstrate that we’ll protect what we value or that we’ll give ourselves away. Healthy boundaries preserve our integrity. Unlike defenses, which isolate us from our true selves and from those we love, boundaries filter out harm. This book provides the tools and insights needed to create boundaries so that we can allow time and energy for the things that matter—and helps break down limiting defenses that stunt personal growth. Focusing on every facet of daily life—from friendships and sexual relationships to dress and appearance to money, food, and psychotherapy—Katherine presents case studies highlighting the ways in which individuals violate their own boundaries or let other people breach them. Using real-life examples, from self-sacrificing mothers to obsessive neat freaks, she offers specific advice on making choices that balance one’s own needs with the needs of others. Boundaries are the unseen structures that support healthy, productive lives. Where to Draw the Line shows readers how to strengthen them and hold them in place every day.